Pink Hollyhock

I collected a lot of pink hollyhock seed in the fall.

Hollyhocks do best in full sun with plenty of water. Photo by Patsy Bell Hobson

I’m giving away: 30 pink Hollyhock seed. Check it out – Listia

When to plant. Some seed can be planted the first week before the last frost date.  Then, in two weeks plant a few more seed. This succession planting will keep you in beautiful blooms throughout the season.

Planting. Get the hollyhock seed off to a good start in well worked soil. After that, you will have little to do except just enjoy their flowers. Start by adding a little organic matter or compost into the planting area.

Plant hollyhock seed just 1/4″ deep. These plants like sunny, moist but well-drained soil.

Be patient. Hollyhocks are biennials. They only produce foliage the first year. Then flower the second year, and then die. They will self seed, so eventually you will have flowers every year.

Many newer varieties will bloom the first year, if they get planted early enough in the spring.

Thinning plants will prevent mildew. You can transplant the thinnings, just be gentle and keep them moist.

You get seeds from every bloom. photo by Patsy Bell Hobson

You get seeds from every bloom. photo by Patsy Bell Hobson

These pink flowers are the single hollyhock, or the old-fashioned flowers. Many newer varieties are double-flowered and some are shorter to handle the wind better.

Swallowtail Garden Seeds has a nice selection of hollyhocks, including the shorter varieties.

Renee’s Garden Seeds and Burpee have hollyhock seed.

The USDA.GOV site has plant profiles:
Plants Profile for Alcea rosea (hollyhock)

I’m giving away: 30 pink Hollyhock seed. Check it out – Listia

This post is similar to Becky’s Flowers

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