Tag Archives: Ozarks

Wildflower Wednesday 6/25/14

Little lilac asters, I think.



IMG_4631Though they look dainty, these small flowers survive in the shallow and poor soil of the glades in the Ozarks regions of Missouri and Arkansas where I took these photos.

Often they are hugging the rocky hillsides and ledges along the highway.

I like them, they are tough, appreciate dry conditions and show up in the fall after much of the color is gone from the trees. At a time when fewer and fewer blooms are around for pollinators, bees are always hovering.

IMG_4720I collected some seed and tossed it out in a gravely spot near the drive. Who knows if it will grow. It is the little weedy thing I wouldn’t notice until it blooms this fall.

Gail at clay and limestone, Wildflower Gardening In Middle Tennessee hosts Wildflower Wednesday.

To share your wildflowers, join in a Celebration of all Wildflowers on the Fourth Wednesday of Each Month.

I always learn a lot from Gail’s posts and she is kind enough to allow my humble submissions to join the party.



Branson Loves Teachers

Read about the great teacher discounts and special offers in Branson all October.

These fall maples are a brilliant golden color. photo: PBH

Branson MO Loves Teachers  ← Click here to learn more.

Start your much deserved weekend with the show that started it all, the Baldknobbers Jamboree. Teachers receive the VIP rate of $16 (+tax). The Baldknobbers are still one of the best live music shows in Branson.

This entertaining Branson original has been packing them in for generations. If it’s been awhile since you’ve seen the Baldknobbers, make a reservation now. The show is packed with new songs, classic country music and the third generation of crazy comedians that will make you grateful you’re not related.

Baldknobbers Jamboree Music Show
2835 W Hwy 76 Box 1, Branson MO 65616
Toll-Free: 800-998-8908, Phone: 417-334-4528

from Branson MO Loves Teachers in the Examiner

Missouri Coneflower

A roadside wildflower in Missouri

A summer roadside wildflower in Missouri

Missouri Coneflower, Rudbeckia missouriensis
Aster family (Asteraceae)


This yellow coneflower is a Missouri native.

Missouri coneflower is a Missouri native perennial. You can find these yellow flowers in limestone glades in the Ozarks. I noticed them along roadsides in late June and early July.

Rudbeckia missouriensis can spread to form wild colonies of yellow flowers growing between 2 and 3 feet tall. Daisy-like flowers have  yellow rays and black center cones.

Narrow green leaves and the multiple stems are hairy. Long summer to early fall bloom period.

You may have seen yellow coneflowers outside of Missouri. Their growing region stretches into AR, IL, LA, MO, OK, TX.

Yellow Coneflower

the leaves and multi branched stems are hairy.

I saw these yellow conflowers on the road to Laura Ingles Wilder’s home and museum.

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